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MERLOT II


    

Learning Exercise


Material: Thinking Maps
Submitted by: Tessie Sanders on Feb 23, 2010
Date Last Modified: Feb 23, 2010
Title: Hey Diddle, Diddle!
Description: Teaching Target: *Identify individual sounds of words, phonemes, in “sound boxes” and that the visual similarity of an ending cluster of letters in known words. Students must decode a new word. It may rhyme if the ending cluster is the same visually. Sound boxes will help increase students’ visual sensitivity to classify phonemes. *Helping students identify and manipulate phonemes increases phonemic awareness.
Type of Task: Group, Student-centered, Supervised
Time Required Teacher will work in small groups in 15-minute blocks while other students are at centers doing individual or cooperative work.
Topics: Student Objective: Student will: • Identify words with visual similarities in context of a poem • Recognize words that sound the same at the end and understand that they rhymes • Apply phonological awareness to help identify unknown words in context • Write new words using analogy-based phonics
Course: Concordia University/ LTC 5330
Audience: Graduate School, Professional
Prerequisites Skills: understand that they rhymes • Apply phonological awareness to help identify unknown words in context • Write new words using analogy-based phonics Instructional Plan: 1. Copy the poem “Hey Diddle, Diddle” onto poster size chart paper 2. Print Rhyming Picture Cards and cut out the pictures. You will need to laminate sheets before cutting. 3. Create two word frames to isolate words on the poster-size chart paper for visual aid. 4. Obtain a copy of Sometimes I Like to Curl Up in a Ball by Vicki and Charles Fudge for guided reading. You may choose another rhyming book… 5. Gather developmentally appropriate books or leveled readers for guided reading during lesson.
Learning Objectives: Student Objective: Student will: • Identify words with visual similarities in context of a poem • Recognize words that sound the same at the end and understand that they rhymes • Apply phonological awareness to help identify unknown words in context • Write new words using analogy-based phonics
Technical Notes: Instructional Plan: 1. Copy the poem “Hey Diddle, Diddle” onto poster size chart paper 2. Print Rhyming Picture Cards and cut out the pictures. You will need to laminate sheets before cutting. 3. Create two word frames to isolate words on the poster-size chart paper for visual aid. 4. Obtain a copy of Sometimes I Like to Curl Up in a Ball by Vicki and Charles Fudge for guided reading. You may choose another rhyming book… 5. Gather developmentally appropriate books or leveled readers for guided reading during lesson. Activities • Shared reading (20 min.) • Collaborative small-group work (10-15min.) • Guided reading (40 min.) Teacher will work in small groups in 15-minute blocks while other students are at centers doing individual or cooperative work. Example of Shared Reading Session Session 1 Display poem “Hey Diddle, Diddle for read-aloud; have students read-aloud when they come to rhyming words. Students will identify words in the poem that are the same. (Students are expected to identify words that begin or end with the same phoneme, that rhyme, or any other similarity that is noticed.) Teacher will point out that moon and spoon rhyme, and how they sound the same. Show picture card by placing them over the words moon and spoon, you will do this with each picture card and word similarity. Session 2 Repeat shared/paired reading of “Hey Diddle, Diddle” with students leading the lesson as they read it aloud as you (teacher) point to each word. For second reading, substitute a pair of rhyming words from the rhyming picture cards. Model writing the words using box shared writing experience. The article “The Letterbox” Lesson: A Hands-on Approach for Teaching Decoding” provides information about how to use the sound boxes to isolate phonemes.
Text of Learning Exercise: Session 3 Collaborative Small-Group Work Assign students into small groups of four and distribute a set of Rhyming Cards to each group. Tell students that they are expected to work together in order to find a pair of pictures that rhyme. While students are in small groups, move around the room and do an informal assessment as to how they recognize rhyming pictures. This assessment will shape future instruction for teaching skills during small group. As students identify rhyming words, ask them to come up and try out their pairs in context or the poem. As you are working in small groups, have other groups practice making new words that have visually similar letter cluster ending words. Extension Have students access the interactive Word Family Sort for additional material. Students sort short-vowel words into word families, using “Word Sorts for Beginning and Struggling Readers”
Additional Information URL: abcteach.com
Assessment: Assessment • Teacher observation and anecdotal notes based on class discussion • Running Records • Student’s ability to write rhyming words using sound boxes.
Assessment URL: edhelper.com
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