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MERLOT II




        

Search > Learning Exercise Results > Ohm's Law Worksheet

Learning Exercise: Ohm's Law Worksheet

Title:
Ohm's Law Worksheet
Material:
Description:
This is a worksheet for non-science majors that explores the meaning of Ohm's law.

Info

Submitted by:
Terry Bradfield
Date Last Modified:
July 26, 2002

Exercise

Ohm's Law Worksheet



Introduction


An electric circuit is a closed loop around which electric charge flows.
A source of electrical energy (such as a battery) is required to maintain
the flow. An simple electric circuit consists of a battery with its terminals
connected by one or more conducting elements. In the first part of this experiment,
you will attempt to verify Ohm's law for a single element:

V = IR


Where V is the emf (voltage), I is the current, and R
is the resistance of the conducting element.The applet for this experiment
is located at: 
http://www.shep.net/resources/curricular/physics/java/physengl/ohmslaw.htm.


Procedure



Measurements






Before attempting any measurements, you have to choose a measurement range. 
Set the maximum voltage to 10 V and the maximum amperage to 300 mA. Use the
buttons to set the resistance to 30 W. Now you
are ready to begin your measurements. Use the voltage buttoms to step the
voltage values from 1 V through 7 V in 1 V steps. For each applied voltage,
record the current in the table below and calculate the ratio V/I.

Current Measurements for a 30.0 W resistance.


































Voltage, in volts (V)
1.00


2.00


3.00


4.00


5.00


6.00

Current, in amperes (I)            
Resistance R = V/I            


Average value of R = _____________.


Next, change the resistance to 60 W and repeat
the process above.



Current Measurements for a 60 Wresistance.



































Voltage, in volts (V)
1.00


2.00


3.00


4.00


5.00


6.00

Current, in amperes (I)            
Resistance R = V/I            


Average value of R = _____________.

& nbsp;


Questions


1. How do the currents in the two resistances compare for the same applied
voltage? ___________________________________________________

 

2. What current would you expect in a 90 W
resistance when a 4.00 V potential is applied? ___________________

 



 

Categories

Audience

  • College General Ed
  • High School

Topics

Ohm's law and resistance

Requirements

Students should be familiar with the definitions of basic electrical quantities.

Learning Objectives

To understand the physical meaning of Ohm's law.

Type of Task

  • Individual
  • Student-centered
  • Unsupervised