Learning Exercise

Elie Wiesel: The Use of Memoir

In a freshmen composition class, understanding the power of memoir for furthering a cause and revealing an individual is compelling. Students often have curiosities about Elie Wiesel upon the completion of reading his novel 'Night. This lesson provides moments of analysis regarding this Nobel Prize winner author and his uses as a writer to affect his readers. The themed focus of this course is IDENTITY, an aspect embedded within this fictionalized memoir.
Course: LAR 112 Western Heritages 2 (a composition course)
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Exercise

Have students note and share curiosities about Wiesel or others who are
Holocaust survivors. These can be guiding questions to direct research on the
website. A focused intent upon the link between writer and identity is
encouraged. An assessment task will include a connection about identity and the
Holocaust.

Provide the website link and encourage students to explore, noting answers or
further wonderings.

Have students prepare a reflection paper (brief in response) on the ideas
gleaned from the website, ideas from the text, and connections to identity. A
focus upon critical thinking should be present. This paper will be submitted
for evaluation.

Have students reread reflection writings in class and then share general ideas
in writing groups (peer groups) seeking to find key points. Individual groups
can report out to the whole via oral expression or written expression (if
technology, overhead, or board is available).

Technical Notes

Student complete the interactivity with the website outside of designated class time.

Requirements

1. Experience in writing in narrative form, recognizing the features of narrative.
2. Comprehension of Wiesel's memoir.

Topics

Holocaust;
Writing to cope;
Identity;
'Night;
Wiesel;

Learning Objectives

1. Interact with the content related to 'Night in an alternative form.
2. Recognize the conflicts embedded within writing a narrative of the Holocaust.
3. Reflect upon the effectiveness of Wiesel's literary work in response to his identity.