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MERLOT II


    

Peer Review


Accelerating Innovation: People, Processes, & Technology

 

Ratings

Overall Rating:

3.75 stars
Content Quality: 4 stars
Effectiveness: 3.25 stars
Ease of Use: 4.25 starsstar
Reviewed: Jun 08, 2008 by Business Editorial Board
Overview: A 1-hour video presentation by Jack Shaw who presented at the 2006 SAP Brazil User Forum in Sao Paulo; topics include innovation to dynamic business process management to cognitive systems. It could be used in a variety of courses (MIS/IT, marketing, operations, e-commerce) as a supplemental lecture. The speech is a "sale" about the importance of changing, specifically technologically, to meet the needs of the global marketplace while maximizing the effectiveness of both large and small business models.
Learning Goals: To understand how supply chains are being radically re-designed using dynamic business process management.
Target Student Population: IT or MIS, marketing, operations, or e-commerce course. Could be used in either a beginning business class or as a supplement for entrepreneurial classes as a homework assignment. Not appropriate for upper division students.
Prerequisite Knowledge or Skills: Some basic understanding of ERP systems.
Type of Material: Lecture/presentation
Recommended Uses: As a supplemental lecture or homework
Technical Requirements: Browser

Evaluation and Observation

Content Quality

Rating: 4 stars
Strengths: The presentation starts with a good description of how the external environment is driving major changes to supply chain management and dynamic business process management. Leads the listeners through a "sale" of why innovation is important to survival and success, plus adds relevant examples from both history and current business models, both large and small.
Concerns: As a presentation to a technical and professional audience, the presenter assumes a level of technical and systems understanding that may be lacking in an undergraduate audience. Context would need to be provided by the instructor. Perhaps the first 30 minutes would be fairly irrelevant to a sophisticated listener. The speaker is "making the case" for his point of view. Many people are already aware of the need and would find that part of the speech to be irrelevant.

Potential Effectiveness as a Teaching Tool

Rating: 3.25 stars
Strengths: The presentation identifies actual companies and how they have been impacted by implementing these new approaches, thereby providing real-life application of theory. The speaker's topic would be effective depending on the listeners' exposure to current global news. If the listener is uninformed, the topic would be very informative.
Concerns: This is not intended as an academic lecture. It is an industry presentation, and the instructor would need to provide some context before its use. But, if the listener reads the newspaper and is current in business trends the topic had little new to add except for some very good examples of businesses who are successful in innovative processes.

Ease of Use for Both Students and Faculty

Rating: 4.25 stars
Strengths: Very easy to use either the whole presentation or segments of the presentation to make a point in the classroom.
Concerns: An undergraduate population may not appreciate a one-hour “talking head” presentation.

Other Issues and Comments: Could expand more on the "hard data" portion of the presentation. The examples were strong, but it would be effective to go into more detail.