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MERLOT II


    

Peer Review


Globalization and Information Acceleration

 

Ratings

Overall Rating:

3.5 stars
Content Quality: 3.5 stars
Effectiveness: 4 stars
Ease of Use: 3.75 stars
Reviewed: Jan 06, 2014 by Business Editorial Board
Overview: This is an animated video that provides facts about world population which is constantly changing, the on-going development of technology and the accelerating flow of information. It is designed to be thought-provoking and asks questions such as "did you know?" in the video and raises issues in general. The author(s) noted there are implications for students, job seekers and educators from the information provided in the video. Discussion questions are provided for an introductory Human Resources class. The video can be used to provoke thought and stimulate discussion about employer challenges related to globalization.
Learning Goals: Learners will develop a greater understanding of the rapid social and technological changes that have taken place over the past 30 years and the implications for leaders, managers, and educators.
Target Student Population: Undergraduate students, and specifically "younger" students as indicated by the information on the website. This reviewer would also recommend any age of undergraduate student including older, working students (as opposed to traditional students) can relate to some of the changes they have already seen.
Prerequisite Knowledge or Skills: Anyone viewing this video would need to know how YouTube works, how to start the video, how the speakers on the computer work, how to use the keyboard, and how to find URLs on the Internet.
Type of Material: Presentation
Recommended Uses: The recommended uses from the author(s) are entry level (undergraduate) principles of management and human resources (HR). Where the video is recommended for use is not discussed so it is not clear if this is intended for in class, homework, individual, team, lecture, etc. However, the content is flexible enough it would work for any of the above. After reviewing the video, the content lends itself to other possible courses such as global business, technology, finance and economics in addition to principles of management and HR. If there is an undergraduate course in organizational change/development, it would also be highly appropriate for use in that course
Technical Requirements: Internet Explorer eight used; Java six; Adobe flash 10

Evaluation and Observation

Content Quality

Rating: 3.5 stars
Strengths: The purpose of the video is to ask questions as earlier noted such as "did you know?" and to stimulate discussions on "what does it mean?". As such, it would be a very effective way to start discussions, a beginning point for homework on some of the topics addressed and possibly good debate topics once research has been completed in preparation for the debate. The questions and the topics provided in the video are thought-provoking, relevant and current. Content is up to date. Statistics cover many relevant areas. Viewers can add comments, including additional discussion questions.
Concerns: It is not clear what students are supposed to do with the content; that is, context is not provided to indicate how/what needs to be considered other than the general questions posed in the video. If this is for a class the assumption is that there would be reasons for feeling this related to the course content but the reasons aren't clear. Citations for statistics are not provided. The author(s) noted there are implications for students, job seekers and educators from the information provided in the video - but it is not clear what these implications might be so it is assumed it would be up to the individual instructor to develop these. Guidance in this area from the author(s) would be beneficial.

Potential Effectiveness as a Teaching Tool

Rating: 4 stars
Strengths: As a starting point in the video poses very thought-provoking questions that should stimulate discussion for students. With the variety of questions there are numerous topics that could potentially be addressed in the course or in various courses. Fast paced content and upbeat music make a highly engaging presentation. Material is clearly presented.
Concerns: No guidance is provided on what should be done with the information; there are no goals or objectives listed for students or educators beyond the questions asked in the video so it's not clear how this will contribute to any class other than stating current issues. Without direction or guidance on what to do with this information, it is not clear what the students can learn or apply from watching the video. As a result, intended outcomes are not clear and it is not clear what the instructor's role is as a relates to this video. Instructors that use this material should be prepared to facilitate sensitive dialogue due to disagreements that may emerge among the class when interpreting the meaning of the statistics.

Ease of Use for Both Students and Faculty

Rating: 3.75 stars
Strengths: Clicking on the video is very simple if the assumption made is true - that everyone using this is familiar with YouTube or similar applications. The questions provided in the video are clear. The key topics in the video would align various actively with specific courses as previously noted; it would also be easy to develop discussion questions relevant to each one of these classes as noted.
Concerns: Access to discussion questions requires registration at site (MindgateMedia.com).

Other Issues and Comments: These videos can be very informative and this reviewer has used several of the "shift" videos in the past but they need to be put into context for what ever topic the instructor wants to convey. As it currently exists the video itself, while interesting, remains vague as to how it can support any class.