The Power of Music
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MERLOT II




        

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The Power of Music

        

The Power of Music

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This is the final lecture by Daniel Barenboim as part of the Reith Lectures at the BBC. Barenboim argues that music should be seen as a metaphor for life, capable of demonstrating the great qualities of leadership.
Material Type: Presentation
Technical Format: Audio
Date Added to MERLOT: February 17, 2008
Date Modified in MERLOT: February 29, 2012
Author:
Submitter: Cathy Swift

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Primary Audience: College General Ed, College Lower Division, College Upper Division, Graduate School
Mobile Compatibility: Not specified at this time
Language: English
Cost Involved: no
Source Code Available: unsure
Accessiblity Information Available: unsure
Creative Commons: unsure

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Avatar for Bridgette Yaxley
2 years ago

Bridgette Yaxley (Student)

I agree it is important for students to understand how "music is a metaphor for life," and also how powerful a piece of music can be. This lesson seems to convey how the written song can have a number of influences on an audience, as well as many meanings that resonate with the listener. I find the point made in this lecture of how certain music (i.e. Beethoveen's 9th symphony) has  been intentionally used and associated during a specific historical period with policital propaganda is interesting, and can be expanded upon with many other examples where lyricists/performers intentionally wrote and recorded songs (i.e. Sting's song "Russians" during the Cold War) for similar purposes. An entire lesson could be taught specifically by heading down that avenue by exploring songs used for war-time propaganda or as a voice for change (something I've worked on to an extent in my own class). Bravissimo!