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MERLOT II




        

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Physlet Problems: Electrostatics

        

Physlet Problems: Electrostatics

Logo for Physlet Problems:  Electrostatics
Physlet problems that relate to electrostatics.
Material Type: Quiz/Test
Technical Format: Java Applet
Date Added to MERLOT: November 21, 2000
Date Modified in MERLOT: January 04, 2008
Author:
Submitter: Chuck Bennett

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About

Primary Audience: College General Ed
Mobile Compatibility: Not specified at this time
Technical Requirements: Physlets may be hosted locally and customized with javascript. Information and resources are available from the home page of the above site.
Language: English
Cost Involved: no
Source Code Available: no
Accessiblity Information Available: no
Creative Commons: unsure

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Discussion for Physlet Problems: Electrostatics

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Avatar for Barbra Bied Sperling
13 years ago

Barbra Bied Sperling (Staff)

I spent something over an hour exploring this material, and highly recommend it.
This collection of problems, though useful in themselves, are perhaps even
more useful as examples and/or templates for instructor-customized physlet
problems. Most are of excellent quality. Both qualitative and quantitative
problems are included within the set. Some are rather difficult, and will
provide a challenge for very good students. Others should be accessible to all
students in an introductory course who take the time to think about them. Most
probe student understanding in ways not accessible to typical end-of-chapter
problems. Some work will need to be done by instructors to modify these (e.g.,
remove the answers, put randomness in the problems) if they are to be useful for
graded homework, although they can be used as is for study self-study beyond
the basic in-class presentation.