Material Detail

Encouraging Mathematical Thinking, Discourse around a Rich Problem

Encouraging Mathematical Thinking, Discourse around a Rich Problem

This videopaper by the Math Forum's Bridging Research and Practice Group (BRAP) of teacher practitioners and Math Forum Staff opens a conversation around the use of discourse as a basis for encouraging students' mathematical thinking and supporting teachers' professional growth. Reflecting an attempt to integrate practice and research, it reports on findings culled from discussions of research articles and chapters, classroom practice, and videotapes of classroom teaching, noting links between these findings and research into student learning and instruction. Video clips from the teachers' classrooms illustrate the interventions discussed; a challenge problem and lessons for various levels are detailed; corresponding student predictions are presented; and readers' reactions and input are... Show More
Rate

Quality

More about this material

Comments

Log in to participate in the discussions or sign up if you are not already a MERLOT member.
Tuiren Bratina
Tuiren Bratina (Faculty)
18 years ago
I spent approximately one-half hour "going through" this article. I spent time
reading it, but did not download the necessary plug-ins to view the accompanying
multimedia presentations.

Quality of content: The article is well written and addresses issues that
should be emphasized, e.g., logical reasoning. They present ideas for using
discourse to promote students' thinking. I would even like to see greater
development of some of the ideas. For example, "How do I know I'm right?" In
terms of mathematical reasoning it would be good to have included several
scenarios about counterexamples, the use of many examples not serving as proof
that a fact/principle/algorithm is true, etc. The Math Forum staff are
continuing to provide materials that help mathematics educators improve the
teaching of mathematics.

Effectiveness for enhancing teaching and learning: Links between their findings
and the research on student learning and instruction are noted. Discussion
focuses on the specific strategies that are used to help students become engaged
in inquiry and take more responsibility and initiative in their learning.

Technical Remarks:

Difficult to use. Must have plug-in for full benefit of this good work. It is
not easy to read the article online. It is also a bit unwieldy to print it
out...many webpages.
hidden