MR. PRESIDENT HOW LONG MUST WOMEN WAIT FOR LIBERTY? MR. PRESIDENT WHAT WILL YOU DO FOR WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE?

Lesson Plan: Women's Suffrage

Created by Sean Reynolds

Information about the Students That Impacts Instruction and Assessments

Student-Teacher Ratio:
Hispanic:
White:Asian
Black:Two or More Races


Student needs assessment:   Students will complete a survey and biography that serves as the foundation to developing a more meaningful teacher/student relationship. 

Table: 1

Students
BlackHispanic/LatinoWhiteEnglish Language LearnerStudents with DisabilitiesIndividualized Education Plans
Boys






Girls






Total







Course Name & Description: 8th Grade Social Studies (Women's Suffrage) Note: This lesson plan format was modified by a template from Tennessee State University and mostly aligns with EdTpa.


Central Focus:  This month  marks the centennial of women's right to vote with the passage of the 19th Amendment.  When the U.S. Constitution was written, it completely excluded women from most of the rights and privileges of being an American citizen.  Free women operated in limited and rigid roles, while enslaved women were excluded from all.  Yet women have actively participated as citizens-organizing, marching, petitioning-since our country's founding.  Sometimes under the radar and sometimes flying in our politicians' faces, women's roles have been redefined.  Women's progress is evident with the record number of women seeking the Democratic nomination for President during the 2020 elections.  In fact, Kamala Harris is the first Black woman and the first person of Indian descent to be nominated for national office by a major party, only the fourth woman in U.S. history to be chosen for a presidential ticket.


Keywords/Tags: Suffrage, Seneca Falls Convention, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sojourner Truth, 

Instructional Delivery: This is primarily designed to be delivered online, however it can easily be adapted for blended instruction.

Pedagogical Approaches:  I designed this lesson with a multimodal approach, and I combine relevant aspects of several learning theories and frameworks. I modified other resources and lesson plans to develop this course and used the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards, Cognitivism, Bloom's Taxonomy, and Gagne's Nine Events of Instruction do structure the content. I also acknowledge that students have different learning preferences and aim to teach to my student's strengths by relying on a variety of pedagogical techniques, delivery approaches, and media.  I created discussion questions and collaborative projects based on the "community of inquiry" model for online learning environments. The Community of Inquiry model emphasizes the cognitive, social, and teaching aspects of learning. I structured this lesson to meet the social, emotional, and cognitive needs of student learning through the Blending with Pedagogical Purpose model. I implemented the Socratic Method and ask open-ended questions that probe what the students know so I can guide their learning.  The main assessment in this course is a final presentation created with PPT and will be developed and assessed throughout the process.  Students will add pages to their presentation as the lesson progresses and will be used to check for student understanding along the way.  Their will be a final grade based on the high impact practice of creating and maintaining an e-portfolio (PPT).


This is an online lesson designed to meet the Tennessee Social Studies Standard 8.42 and Content Strands C, H, P.  The central focus of this learning segment is to analyze the development of women's suffrage.  Students will examine and cite primary source documents related to the Seneca Falls Convention.  Furthermore, students will understand the women's movement from  perspectives and connect events of the convention to current events.



Students with Disabilities: 
Students who have educational, psychological, and/or physical disabilities may be eligible for accommodations that provide equal access to educational programs and activities. These students should notify the instructor immediately.




Lesson Standards

Standards

Curriculum Standards

  • TN 8.42 Analyze the development of the women's suffrage movement, including the Seneca Falls Convention, and the ideals of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6.8.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.

Social Studies Practices 

  • SSP.01Collect data and information from a variety of primary and secondary sources, including: Printed materials (e.g., literary texts, newspapers, political cartoons, autobiographies, speeches, letters, personal journals) 
    • Graphic representations (e.g., maps, timelines, charts, photographs, artwork) 
    • Artifacts 
    • Media and technology sources.
  • SSP.02Critically examine a primary or secondary source in order to:
    • Extract and paraphrase significant ideas and relevant information
    • Distinguish the difference between fact and opinion 
    • Draw inferences and conclusions 
    • Recognize author’s purpose, point of view, and bias 
    • Assess the strengths and limitations of arguments
  • SSP.05Synthesize data from multiple sources in order to: 
    • Recognize differences among multiple accounts 
    • Establish validity by comparing and contrasting multiple sources 
    • Frame appropriate questions for further investigation

International Society of Technology in Education (ISTE) Standards

  • 5a Use technology to create, adapt, and personalize learning experiences that foster independent learning and accommodates learner differences and needs.

(Upload syllabus from pre-designed course)

Student Learning Objectives



Student Learning Objectives: Know—Understand—Do

The students will know:

  • The influence Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth had on the social and political advancements of women.
  • What the women's movement fought for and what the results were.

The students will understand:

  • The significance of the Seneca Falls convention during the women’s movement and the ideals of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth.

The students will be able to:

  • Explain the fundamental differences in the ideals of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth.
  • Identify similarities and analyze the Declaration of Sentiments and the Declaration of Independence.
  • Trace the progression of the women’s movement and suffrage.
  • Identify and analyze key figures in the women’s movement.
  • Evaluate how the women’s movement expanded their rites in marriage, family, and careers.

Essential questions:

  • Why do societies change?
  • What motivates people to act? (Consider current events that include the protests for racial justice).
  • How do evolving or new ideas change the way we live? (Consider how the ideas of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth changed how women live).

What will I learn?  In this lesson, you will learn about the women's movement, the Seneca Falls Convention, and the Ideals of key figures in the fight for women's rights.

Why is the women's movement important to me? It is important to understand that new ideas change society. Imagine if women were not allowed to vote in this upcoming election.

How do I know I have met the lesson objectives?  I will provide you formative assessments throughout the course that will guide my instruction to meet your needs.  You can feel confident that you have mastered the lesson when you are able to identify key figures in the women's movement and understand the importance of the Seneca Falls Convention.


Primary Sources

  • INSERT PRIMARAY SOURCES

Secondary Sources

  • INSERT SOURCES

Language Function

Vacab:

  • Electorate
  • Affect/Effect
  • 19th Amendment

Media/Technology: 

Student Materials List:

Planning to Use and Support Academic Language Demands

Language Function

  • Students will know the influence Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth had on the social and political advancements of women.
  • Students will understand the significance of the Seneca Falls convention during the women’s movement and the ideals of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth.
  • Explain the fundamental differences in the ideals of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth.
  • Identify similarities and analyze the Declaration of Sentiments and the Declaration of Independence.
  • Trace the progression of the women’s movement and suffrage.
  • Identify and analyze key figures in the women’s movement.
  • Evaluate how the women’s movement expanded their rites in marriage, family, and careers.


Discourse 

  • Read- Articles and Primary Sources
  • Write Essays 
  • Create Presentations
  • Speak during live discussions and zoom meetings
  • Live Zoom Meetings
  • method students use to express their understanding of subject matter

Syntax 

  • Essays
  • PPT
  • Written Online Discussion Forum
  • Multi-media


Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks

Engage: Create a survey that allows students to vote on topic and then explain to the class that you would only be considering the vote of the boys in the classroom.   Have each student formulate a discussion response of what impact that exclusion may play in the decision.

Instruction:  Provide background on the role women played in American society during the 19th century.

Differentiation and Planned Supports: I will differentiate content by providing extended learning opportunities of for students who have mastered the content ahead of schedule.

Below Level:  Have students conduct additional research about the Seneca Falls convention.  Include participants beyond those named in the text and include the diversity of opinions of the women and men who attended.  Using this research, ask each student to create a biographical sketch of one of these less prominent conventioneers, including what the individual did in the years after 1848.

At Level:  During a live session using zoom, have a volunteer read the second paragraph of the text’s description of the Seneca Falls Convention.  Lead a discussion focused on discrimination of women in the mid-nineteenth century.   Have your students use a T-chart to compare women’s circumstances then and now in terms of social, political, and economic participation.

Accommodations:

Emerging: Read Jones speech aloud.  Identify the words and phrases that are most forceful.  Discuss how you think the women listening to her in 1850 were affected by the speech.

Expanding:  Help students read the speech aloud and have them identify words or phrases that help them understand her main ideas of her message.  Discuss her particular use of the word “wrongs” as contrasted to the word “rights”.

Bridging:  Read the speech aloud and ask students to work with a partner to rewrite her speech final sentence in their own words.  The pair will share sentences and discuss her choice of words compared to their own.


MAKING CONNECTIONS TODAY

I will explain to students that the United States has a program funded by states and the federal government to preserve historical sites and interpret them for the public.   The site of the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 is one.  Today people from all over the world visit the Women’s Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls, New York.  Two chief attractions of the park are Wesleyan Chapel, where the convention was held, and the Elizabeth Cady Stanton House.  I will take you on a virtual tour of both.  At this time, students will visit the virtual tour of Seneca Falls New York that I crated and narrated.


Misconceptions/Misunderstandings


Assessments

Formative Assessment

  • You will take a pre-assessment to determine what they already know about the women's movement.  I will use the results to make real-time adjustments to the content in order to meet my your needs.
  • The discussion forums and live group collaborations are graded for participation and quality of content.  These meetings promote social engagement and development, and provide an opportunity to assess your understanding of the content.
  • The essays and PPTs are graded based on your understanding of the content and design.

Summative Assessment

  • Students will take a standardized test at the end of the course and must score 80% to receive their course certificate.  This assessment will be compared to the pre-assessment to determine if I have met the needs of my students.
  • I will evaluate  your e-Portfolio based on the rubric posted in the course syllabus.  Please make sure you have included all of the artifacts in your e-Portfolio.

Assessment During Instruction Time:

Practice Tasks:  All assignments will be graded and returned with feedback so you will have an opportunity to make corrections. You can make corrections based on my input and resubmit for a re-score before attaching it to your e-Portfolio.

Assessment Feedback During Structured Practice:  I will provide you with constant and critical feedback.  This feedback should be used to as a tool for improvement and growth.

Instructor Reflection

  • Reflect on your participation in redesigning a course, development of an ePortfolio, participation in CSU Course Redesign Professional Learning Community Share any plans to disseminate/publish the findings of your course redesign activity.

Virtual Classroom (Zoom)

News

The State of Tennessee will commemorate its role in the Ratification of the 19th Amendment, which occurred 100 years ago and guaranteed the right to vote for women throughout the United States, with a reenactment of the historic and close vote.






How to Evaluate Sources


Important Notices

Class Rules and Standards of Conduct:

As an online student, communication is a bit different than in a face-to-face setting. Minimum social interactions are a shared concern with online teaching and learning. Much of our communication will be via written text in an online environment. Because this means you are missing body language cues and immediate feedback from your “listener,” it is essential to understand some standard rules for acceptable online etiquette. These rules ensure the message you intend to convey is received correctly.


1. Be respectful. While it is easier to say hurtful or disrespectful things without standing face-to-face with someone, it is essential to remember that your classmates and teachers are real people who are affected by the words you say and write. It is crucial to keep in mind others' feelings and opinions, even if they differ from your own. If you wouldn't say it to someone's face, don't say it online either.


2. Be aware of strong language, all caps, and exclamation points. It is easy for written text to be misread and misunderstood. Have you ever sent a text message with good intent, but your recipient thought you were rude? If so, then you've experienced this firsthand. By being mindful of strong language, you can identify potential confusion before sending messages. Tip: Read everything out loud before you send it.


3. Be careful with humor and sarcasm. Indeed, you shouldn't avoid being funny. We love to see your personality shine through in online classes. Many of our teachers are exceptionally funny too. But like mentioned in Rule #2, make sure that you are being funny and not being rude. Emoticons and smileys can be helpful when conveying humor or sarcasm so that it is read correctly. Just remember to keep the smiley faces away from academic papers. 😉


4. Yes, grammar and spelling matter. While texting, textspeak can b gr8 4 your friends. In an educational setting (even online), however, keep it formal. Your written communication should be professional and reflect the proper writing style. Save written shortcuts and less than stellar grammar for Snapchat if you must, but follow grammar rules for school.


5. Cite your sources. Whenever you share an idea that originated from someone else (even if it is not word for word), it is good practice to cite that source. Citation applies to discussion forums too. If you read a great thought in your text, share it, but be sure you let your audience know where you saw it first.


6. Don't post or share (even privately) inappropriate material. Enough said there. Nothing is truly private online.

7. Be forgiving. Remember that not everyone will know these rules before posting. Try to be understanding of others when they struggle with written communication. It is very different than only talking to a person face-to-face.


These rules were adapted and modified from the following sources:

Get Started by Clicking on the "Content" or "Get Started Tab"

Assessments

Formative Assessment

  • You will take a pre-assessment to determine what they already know about the women's movement.  I will use the results to make real-time adjustments to the content in order to meet my your needs.
  • The discussion forums and live group collaborations are graded for participation and quality of content.  These meetings promote social engagement and development, and provide an opportunity to assess your understanding of the content.
  • The essays and PPTs are graded based on your understanding of the content and design.

Summative Assessment

  • Students will take a standardized test at the end of the course and must score 80% to receive their course certificate.  This assessment will be compared to the pre-assessment to determine if I have met the needs of my students.
  • I will evaluate  your e-Portfolio based on the rubric posted in the course syllabus.  Please make sure you have included all of the artifacts in your e-Portfolio.

Assessment During Instruction Time:

Practice Tasks:  

  • All assignments will be graded and returned with feedback so you will have an opportunity to make corrections. You can make corrections based on my input and resubmit for a re-score before attaching it to your e-Portfolio.

Assessment Feedback During Structured Practice:  

  • I will provide you with constant and critical feedback.  This feedback should be used to as a tool for improvement and growth.

Grade Breakdown

Biography: 50 pts.
Week Three Assignment: 50 pts.
Weekly Assignments: Possible 350 pts. 35% of Final Grade
Learning Preferences Survey: 15 pts.
Week Three Discussion: 10 pts.
Surveys, Discussions, and Biography: 150 pts. 15% of Final Grade
Feedback Survey: 15 pts.
Week Four Assignment: 50 pts.
E-Portfolio: 400 pts. 40% of Final Grade
E-Portfolio: 400 pts.
Week Four Discussion: 10 pts.
E-Portfolio: 400 pts. 40% of Final Grade
Final Exam: 100 pts.
Week Five Assignment: 50 pts.
Final Exam: 100 pts.  10% of Final Grade
Week One Assignment: 50 pts.
Week Five Discussion: 10 pts.

Week One Discussion: 10 pts.
Week Six Assignment: 50 pts.

Week Two Assignment: 50 pts.
Week Seven Assignment: 50 pts.

Week Two Discussion: 10 pts.
Week Seven Discussion: 10 pts.
Total: 1000 pts.

Closure

What Ifs

Assess the teacher

Challenges my Students Encountered

  • What challenges did the students encounter in the redesigned activities? E.g., technical challenges, organization of course, and redesigned activities.

Teaching Tips

  • What advice do you have for others who might want to use this redesigned course?

Course Redesign Obstacles

  • What challenges did you confront and how did you overcome them?

Strategies I Used to Increase Engagement

  • I aim to make my classroom a broadly accessible space, in which students can fully participate and actively learn.
    Principles Of Student Engagement In A Virtual Classroom