letters in varied languages

ICT Literacy in World Languages

Compiled by Dr. Lesley Farmer, California State University Long Beach
 

GENERAL:

 

MERLOT LINKS:

Key terms: music; music education; specific instruments, genres, creation, applications (e.g., business)

  • Education/ TeacherEd/ Teaching Methods/ Foreign Language
  • Humanities/ World Languages
  • Academic Support Services/ ICT literacy
  • Academic Support Services/Library and Information Services

https://www.merlot.org/merlot/WorldLanguages.htm   


LIBGUIDES:

 

OTHER WEBSITES and ARTICLES:
LEARNING ACTIVITIES IDEA STARTERS:
  • Ask students to research the same topic in two database aggregators (e.g., MLA, JSTOR, Project MUSE), and compare the process and results. Ask them to note those articles published in different languages, and determine into what languages those articles were translated. 
  • Ask students select a seminal work on a world language literature topic, and then identify sources that preceded and continued the conversation, analyzing the impact of the seminal work on the field. 
  • Ask students to create a citation "web" using a citation analysis database, and conduct a content analysis of the linked authors by affiliation (workplace, academic preparation, geography, subject expertise). Do authors cite each other? Are there some authors who are outliers in the web? How do such connections impact information generation?  
  •  Ask students research the impact of digital format in world language scholarly publication, including Open Source initiative.
  • Ask students to research the quality of translations of texts between languages. 
  • Ask students to research the history of technology as it impacts world language (e.g., access to documents, language learning, publishing). 
  • Ask students to create a concept map about one piece of world language literature. 
  • Ask students to create a digital story about one piece of world language literature. 
  • Ask students to create an infographic about an aspect of a world language. 
  • Ask students to create a podcast that helps one learn a world language (e.g., cognates, false cognates, vocabulary for transportation). 
  • Ask students to create a graphic novel in their world language.
  •  Ask students to produce a virtual museum about the times of a piece of world literature (e.g., Candide). 
  • Ask students to critique and compare a piece of world literature and movies in different languages based on it (e.g., War and Peace). 
  • Ask students to critique translations of movies or television shows, both from English to non-English, and vice versa. 
  • Ask students to create a timeline for a literary genre within their world language. 
  • Ask students to research the state of publishing in their world language (note that several countries may be publishing in the same language). Ask students to compare those countries’ efforts. 
  • Ask students to research intellectual property law (both within the country as well as international law) as it applies to publishing in their world language. 
  • Ask students to interview personnel in different jobs that depend on world language translating. 
  • Ask students to create a language “tree” of their world language, and locate sound-bytes for the different related languages. 
  • Ask students to locate websites or other audio documentation about dialects in their world language, and “pin” them on a digital map. 
  • Ask students to create a game to help players learn their world language. 
  • Ask students to create a virtual museum of cultural heritage artifacts reflecting their world language. 
  • Ask students to research the role of their world language in U.S. history using primary sources (consult http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html)
  • Ask students to role-play visiting the U.S. but knowing only their world language.