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ICT Literacy in Agriculture & Environmental Sciences

Compiled 2019 by Dr. Lesley Farmer, California State University Long Beach
 

 GENERAL:

 

MERLOT LINKS:

Key terms: agriculture, biology, environment, ecology, natural resources, food, plants, animals, soil, climate, veterinary science

  • Science and Technology / Biology
  • Science and Technology / Agriculture and Environmental Sciences
  • Academic Support Services/ ICT literacy
  • Academic Support Services/Library and Information Service 

 

LIBGUIDES:

 

OTHER WEBSITES and ARTICLES:
  • Caminita, C. M. (2015). Embedding the agriculture librarian in an agriculture residential college: A case study. Journal of Agricultural & Food Information, 16(1), 31–42. 
  • Debose, K. G., & Miller, R. K. (2015). Stewarding our first-year students into the information ecosystem: A case Study. Journal of Agricultural & Food Information, 16(2), 123–133. 
  •  Gilman, N. V., Sagàs, J., Camper, M., & Norton, A. P. (2017). A faculty-librarian collaboration success story: Implementing a teach-the-teacher library and information literacy instruction model in a first-year agricultural science course. Library Trends, 65(3), 339–358. 
  • Kesselman, M. A., & Sherman, A. (2009). Linking information to real-life problems: An interdisciplinary collaboration of librarians, departments, and food businesses. Journal of Agricultural & Food Information, 10(4), 300–318.
  • Majetic, C., & Pellegrino, C. (2018). Building information literacy skills using science news media: Evidence for a hands-on approach. Journal of College Science Teaching, 48(1), 83–91.
  • O’Clair, K., & Gillard, S. M. (2018). Student perceptions of an online model for library orientation in agriculture and related disciplines. Journal of Agricultural & Food Information, 19(1), 21–36. 
  •  Pautz, M., & Gauder, H. (2016). Undergraduate research needs: Faculty-librarian collaboration to improve information literacy in policy papers. Conference Papers -- Southern Political Science Association, 1–27. 
  • Stapleton, S., Minson, V., & Spears, L. (2017). Investigating the research practices of agriculture scholars: Findings from the University of Florida. Journal of Agricultural & Food Information, 18(3/4), 327–346. 
  • Waters, N. (2015). A poster assignment connects information literacy and writing skills. Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship, (80), 1. https://doi-org.csulb.idm.oclc.org/10.5062/F4K935JV 

  

LEARNING ACTIVITIES IDEA STARTERS:
  • Ask students to research a plant or animal in terms of agricultural adaptation.
  • Ask students to create a timeline of an agricultural or environmental concept (e.g., theories about location, land use).
  • Ask students to research the design, manufacturing, marketing, dissemination, and sales of a non-GMO food product compared to a genetically modified food product.
  • Ask students to use drawing or image editing software to make variations of a biome.
  • Ask students to compare biomes around the world by curating images of its flora, fauna, and impact on agriculture.
  • Ask students to research the cultural connotation of agriculture in different cultures.
  • Ask students to research historical or cultural influences of agriculture.
  • Ask students to research intellectual property law (both copyright and patents/trademarks) as it applies to agriculture or environmental sciences.
  • Ask students to interview personnel in different jobs that build on agriculture or environmental sciences.
  • Ask students to research the total cost of a garment, from growing the fiber (e.g., sheep, flax) to its processing, including all manufacturing/production costs, marketing and sales.
  • Ask students to research the same topic in two database aggregators (e.g., ABI/INFORM, Agricola, ACSESS Digital Library, Biological Abstracts, CAP Abstracts, GreenFILE, Scopus, Web of Science), and compare the process and results.
  • Ask students to analyze the representation of agriculture in movies (e.g., Cowspiracy, Food, Inc., Grapes of Wrath, Milagro Beanfield War,).
  • Ask students to research the impact of technology on agriculture or environmental sciences.
  • Ask students to research the impact of agriculture on technology (e.g., genetically modified organisms).
  • Ask students to create an infographic about an agriculture or environmental sciences topic.
  • Ask students to research famous environmental scientists, and their connections/influences on each other by developing an annotated concept map/web.
  • Ask students to create a virtual museum exhibit about an aspect of agriculture or environmental sciences.
  • Ask students to research how agriculture has impacted wars.
  • Ask students to investigate the impact of agriculture in U.S. history using primary sources (e.g., the Library of Congress’s American Memory collections: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html).
  • Ask students to create a public service announcement that is related to an environmental topic (e.g., recycling, conservation). 
  • Ask students to research the impact (social, economic, environmental) of some agricultural practice. 
  • Ask students to take photos of an environmental science concept, and annotate them in terms of locale, evidence of the concept, and implications.