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Globalization and Social Movements

Common Course ID: Globalization and Social Movements/ Sociology 590

[CSUSB] Jose Munoz Open Textbook Adoption Portrait

Abstract: This open textbook is being utilized in a Sociology course for students by Jose Munoz at CSU, San Bernardino. The 590 course is required for our majors. My course in Globalization and Social Movements challenges students to think about why people join movements, why they stay, what capacities are created, and what settings do they take place in.The material in many cases deals with domestic, international, and transnational forms of movement action. The major goal for the course is for students to explore what Sociologists do when engaging in social movement research.

About the Textbook

Textbook Title: Globalization and Social Movement

Description: SOCIOLOGY 590 (4 units): Special topic in Globalization and Social Movements. The 590 course is required for our majors. My course in Globalization and Social Movements challenges students to think about why people join movements, why they stay, what capacities are created, and what settings do they take place in. The material in many cases deals with domestic, international, and transnational forms of movement action. The major goal for the course is for students to explore what Sociologists do when engaging in social movement research.

AuthorsFrancesca Polletta, University of California- Irvine and Clifford Bob, Duquesne University
Formats: List formats available including PDF, web, ePub, bookshare, etc. Link to any publisher information including print copy availability.

Supplemental resources: List resources including online homework systems, interactive study guides for students, and faculty-only resources such as solutions and slides that are available.
Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:  

  • This course provides several opportunities to push your thinking, writing, and research skills all of which you will need for the job market and/or in graduate school. 
  • In this class, we are approaching social movements through a non “encyclopedic” approach. This means that you will be learning about social movement as you are conducting your own research. 
  • The project will take the entire quarter as you develop a project to be completed in segments. In order to practice how we can apply social movement research you will have work groups where this will be one of the tasks for each week. 
  • Threshold concepts (concepts you will take away from the course): Social Movement, Social Movement Organization, Globalization, Disruptive actions (protests, demonstrations, walkouts, etc), Data collection, Theory application

Cost savings: There is no cost to providing an online version for my students. I have 25 students in my class. By adopting online versions of my texts students saved a total of $56.87.

Accessibility and diversity statement: 
 - Are the technologies used readily available and affordable for students? Yes, my student have access to a range of tools to access campus resources. Our campus goes to great lengths in providing this kind of access.

-  Do the pedagogical strategies support learners with diverse cultural, ethnic, and gender backgrounds? I would say yes. We have a range of teaching skills on campus and a supportive environment that pushes new advances in pedagogy.

About the Course

Course Number: Sociology 590. Globalization &Social Movements

Description:  SOC 590 In-depth study of a selective topic in Sociology. Survey of a specific sub-field with an emphasis on writing research papers or research proposals.

Prerequisites: Sociology 307
GE credit: 4 units, Sociology core class
Learning outcomes:  

  • The 590 course is one of the options our students have for a culminating experience in their undergraduate training. Students must have completed a methods course before they can enroll. The majority of students are graduate seniors.
  • This course provides several opportunities to push your thinking, writing, and research skills all of which you will need for the job market and/or in graduate school. 
  • In this class, we are approaching social movements through a non “encyclopedic” approach. This means that you will be learning about social movement as you are conducting your own research. This project will take the entire quarter as you develop a project to be completed in segments. In order to practice how we can apply social movement research you will have work groups where this will be one of the tasks for each week.
  • Other Demonstrations of learning 
    1. Case study construction (put together in several steps over the course of the quarter) –none of the steps are graded/scored but they are commented on only if turned in on time. 
    2. Literature Review construction 
    3. As part of the course you will present your finding in poster format on blackboard.

Curricular changes:
What did you change as part of the OER adoption?  I did change both my textbooks and syllabus in my OER adoption. I used the texts as my primary readings for the course. I tend to draw on multiple readings for this course, however, I felt staying with the text would allow for a greater possibility for sharing. I geared the majority of the blackboard discussion groups prompts for discussion around the two books. Additionally, I used the embedded links for textbook in my syllabus. Finally, I provided videos on social movements that best spoke to a particular book chapter content of a given week.

How and where do students access materials?  Students are required to access the books through our campus library. The student can access the entire text or download the chapters. Freedom is an Endless Meeting and The Marketing of Rebellion

Teaching and learning impacts:
Collaborate more with other faculty : No
Use wider range of teaching materials: Yes/No
Student learning improved : No
Student retention improved : n/a
Any unexpected results: No

Address any impacts that need a fuller explanation here.

Sharing Best Practices 
The sustainability of open education relies on sharing with others.  List anything you wish that you had known earlier.

  • Before creating a syllabus explore the books and other readings your library has.
  • Think about how the use of online sources will marry well with the themes and assignments for your class.
  • Think about those students who may not like using online materials. How will you accommodate them? 
  • Some students may fall in the middle and may at time want a printed copy. 

From an email a student sent:  “So for example books that are for my major i want hard copies because I actually want to grasp the information and go back to them if I ever need to. I don’t like reading online because I can’t seem to grasp the information.”


How might you adapt to this? 
Students she be told about the possibility printing out copies may cost them more versus buying the book such as the costs for printing paper and buying ink.

How do you plan to share this OER experience with other faculty, staff, etc. who develop curriculum and teach? Well first I will post my contribute to the AL$ program to our department website. I think faculty can learn from my experience. I will specifically meet with my chair to brainstorm about OER strategies for our courses.
Sample assignment:  Link or upload a sample assignment that illustrates how the open textbook is used in the course. Include the rubric that is used for evaluating student work.

Textbook Adoption

OER Adoption Process

By using books that are accessible online through our campus library I can reduce the cost of the course for my students. Allowing students to access material online for free reduces the stress of having to purchase multiple books for a course. Additionally, the practices provide more exposure to students about how to access library holdings.  I was aware of initiatives on campus exploring online materials for courses. I began to think about the ways in which I could save money on books plus I was aware that the library had online copies of the books I used for my own research. These two ideas led to thinking about what courses could use online resources.
Student access: Consulted librarians, other faculty, browsed OER sites, read peer reviews, evaluated resources, etc.

Student feedback or participation: Responses to the content as well as the new ways for accessing or learning with open educational resources.  Feel free to include student quotes and videos.  An email from a student included a statement about why the student like online books:

“It’s easier to read for me. My laptop allows me to highlight the book and mark up the book the way I want so if I make a mistake, I can easily erase. Cost doesn’t really matter to me when it comes to hard copy or online.”

Share any feedback from students regarding usage of the open textbook. If students participate in open textbook development or formal review, describe here.

José A. Muñoz

At CSUSB I offer several advanced classes. The 590 course is an advanced research class where the students in my course learn qualitative methods. Our 590s are a required course for our major. The 590 course is one of the options our students have for a culminating experience in their undergraduate training. The majority of students are seniors. My 590 Social Movements and Globalization class provides students with an opportunity for using advanced methods and examine contemporary social movement activity. I used two texts that were accessible through our campus library database. The other courses I teach at CSUSB include Qualitative Methods, Theory, and Latino Sociology.

I am collaborating with several scholars as part of the American Sociological Association’s Task Force on First-Generation and Working Class Persons in Sociology. Over the next year we will analyze data on the experiences of students and faculty in the discipline for an eventual submission of a report to the American Sociological Association President and Council. I will extend this project further by exploring the experiences of Latino faculty in Southern California. This work will be conducted while serving as one of three Visiting Scholars (2020-2021) at UCLA’s Institute for American Cultures Ethnic Studies Fellowship Program. While at UCLA I will be affiliated with the Chicano Studies Research Center.