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 CHOOSING TECHNOLOGY FOR LEARNING

 How do you match technology tools with your curriculum? How do I help students learn with technology? Find out in this tutorial.  

We want students to apply their knowledge: to be producers of information, not just consumers of information. Technology has expanded the possible methods of representing and communicating ideas. The following activities focus on ways that students can demonstrate competency and apply their knowledge by incorporating ICT literacy. To help you do these activities, it is a good idea to think of a course and a specific knowledge set or skill that you want students to demontrate through some kind of product (e.g.,  video essay, infographic, audio narrative, etc.).

 


 This Australian video about considerations for choosing technology for teaching provides a good overview:  https://ltto.unsw.edu.au/considerations-for-choosing-technology-for-teaching/ What considerations stand out for you?

Activity 1: Remix-T is a great website for choosing and using resources for rich learning activities. Keeping in mind your course objectives, explore the Remix-T project galley:  https://remix.nd.edu/showcase.html    What are a couple of projects that look promising for your students to do? Why?

 


 Activity 2: As students demonstrate competency through producing information products, they will need to use tools (and learn how those tools work). Explore some of the technology tools that Remix-T explains: https://remix.nd.edu/media.html

 


 Activity 3: How might you incorporate these tools (and specific Remix-T URLs) into your course? Remix-T provides a number of projects, with guidance on designing and implementing them: https://remix.nd.edu/projects.html   Choose one project, and check out some of the relevant supporting documentation. Remix-T also suggests that you pilot-test the project yourself to get an idea of the amount of effort and time that are likely to be required.


 Activity 4: Assessment should be done throughout the course. For student project, both the process and the product should be assessed, ideally after a first draft as well as at the end so you and students can make adjustments accordingly (including more instruction).

 Good source of assessment tools are listed in the following bookmark collection: https://www.merlot.org/merlot/viewPortfolio.htm?id=1053206&hitlist=userId=23711&

 

Your students' work may well qualify as a learning object, and could be contributed to MERLOT, which further strengthens this community and its own product.