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Basic Knowledge and Conditions of Knowledge

Basic Knowledge and Conditions of Knowledge

How do we know what we know? In this stimulating and rigorous book, Mark McBride explores two sets of issues in contemporary epistemology: the problems that warrant transmission poses for the category of basic knowledge; and the status of conclusive reasons, sensitivity, and safety as conditions that are necessary for knowledge. To have basic knowledge is to know (have justification for) some proposition immediately, i.e., knowledge (justification) that doesn’t depend on justification for any other proposition. This book considers several puzzles that arise when you take seriously the possibility that we can have basic knowledge. McBride’s analysis draws together two vital strands in contemporary epistemology that are usually treated in isolation from each other. Additionally, its... Show More
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Soon-Ah Fadness
Soon-Ah Fadness (Faculty)
14 weeks ago
This book does provide in-depth analysis of the conditions of knowledge and is appropriate for upper-division Philosophy majors. But for lower-division, non-philosophy majors at a community college, it is too technical, narrow, and advance, as the majority of them are grappling with whether they can know anything and if so, what grounds the things they can know.
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