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Genres

Genres

Stand-Alone PowerPoint activity begins with a student, interactive, pretest and then concrete instruction. Students will be shown examples of different types of fictional genre. Students will then apply knowledge learned through practice examples. Next students will be asked to answer a variety of questions. This activity allows for confirmation of knowledge or allows for reteaching.

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Joe Matulis
Joe Matulis (Teacher (K-12))
7 years ago

I like the idea of the Pre test. Does the students results from the pretest change their lesson in any way? For example, if a student get a question correct about poetry in the pretest the student then get to skip the poetry part of the lesson because they are already know the material. I don’t know why but the videos didn’t work on my computer but I assume, from other comments, that they are trailers from films. Videos make things very easy for some students to understand. Some of the questions can just be answered by clicking on the background.

Time spent reviewing site: 15
Liat Rothfeld
Liat Rothfeld (Teacher (K-12))
7 years ago

Hi Michelle,

Your StAIR is organized logically, and your use of color, graphics, animation, audio, and video will most definitely engage students! Great idea to use video trailers as examples of different genres. That makes the content more relevant and authentic to students, and helps them to see that genre doesn’t just apply to printed literature. It’s helpful that students have the chance to go back and try a question again if it isn’t answered correctly. In addition to this, maybe you could give some sort of clue to help the student answer it correctly the second time. This might also prevent them from simply clicking until they get the right answer.

I noticed that a few slides with text transition to the following slide automatically. To support varied reading levels, it might be helpful to have a “next slide” button on these slides that students can click when done reading, allowing them to take as much time as they need before the slide disappears. Maybe you could also give it a more positive/encouraging spin? Like in the graphics you used when a student gets a question incorrect, in the pretest graphic, and in phrases you used like “Not much more, I promise.”  Thanks for sharing!

Time spent reviewing site: 15 minutes