Peer Review for material titled "Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot"
eTextbook Reviews for material titled "Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot"
User Rating for material titled "Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot"
Member Comments for material titled "Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot"
Bookmark Collections for material titled "Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot"
Course ePortfolios for material titled "Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot"
Learning Exercises for material titled "Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot"
Accessibility Info for material titled "Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot"
Please enter a Bookmark title
Please limit Bookmark title to 65 characters
Please enter a description
Please limit Bookmark title to 4000 characters
A Bookmark with this title already existed.
Please limit a note about this material to 2048 characters
Search all MERLOT
Select to go to your profile
Select to go to your workspace
Select to go to your Dashboard Report
Select to go to your Content Builder
Select to log out
Search Terms
Enter username
Enter password
Please give at least one keyword of at least three characters for the search to work with. The more keywords you give, the better the search will work for you.
Select OK to launch help window
Cancel help

MERLOT II

Advanced Search



        

Search > Material Results >

Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot

        

Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot

Logo for Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot
The story continues.  Even after 90 years, the argument about what happened in the "Black Wall Street" of Tulsa, Oklahoma on May 31, 1921 the truth is being debated. From 1921 to 1995 the costliest Race Riot in America was kept hidden from the Oklahoma History text, and the American Public until the then Governor of Oklahoma, Keating, confirmed the bloody action had taken place. I was part of the Oklahoma Segregated School and Oklahoma History was part of the curriculum. Blacks were absent in... More
Go to material
Go to mirror
Material Type: Case Study
Technical Format: HTML/Text
Date Added to MERLOT: June 24, 2011
Date Modified in MERLOT: July 09, 2015
Authors:
Send email to stephc5@u.washington.edu
Keywords: Greenwood Enclave Riot, Tulsa Race Riot, Oklahoma Race Riot Commission

Quality

  • Reviewed by members of Editorial board for inclusion in MERLOT.
    Editor Review
    Good quality material; may be reviewed
    avg: 4 rating
  • User review 4 average rating
  • User Rating: 4 user rating
  • Discussion (1 Comment)
  • Learning Exercises (none)
  • Bookmark Collections (2)
  • Course ePortfolios (none)
  • Accessibility Info (none)

  • Rate this material
  • Create a learning exercise
  • Add accessibility information
  • Pick a Bookmark Collection or Course ePortfolio to put this material in or scroll to the bottom to create a new Bookmark Collection
    Name the Bookmark Collection to represent the materials you will add
    Describe the Bookmark Collection so other MERLOT users will know what it contains and if it has value for their work or teaching. Other users can copy your Bookmark Collection to their own profile and modify it to save time.
    Edit the information about the material in this {0}
    Submitting Bookmarks...

About

Primary Audience: High School, College General Ed, College Lower Division, College Upper Division, Graduate School, Professional
Mobile Compatibility: Not specified at this time
Technical Requirements: None
Language: English
Cost Involved: no
Source Code Available: no
Accessibility Information Available: no
Creative Commons: unsure

Connections



QR Code for this Page

Users who viewed this material also viewed...

Discussion

Discussion for Greenwood, Okla.: The Legacy of the Tulsa Race Riot

Log in to participate in the discussions or Sign up if you are not already a MERLOT member.

Return to Top of Page
Avatar for Larry Menyweather-Woods
5 years ago

Larry Menyweather-Woods (Faculty)

I have used this story in the classroom to introduce the roles and power of the media during in American History which in many instances were covered up. This story had been passed on, but many did not want to believe such action occurred. This story reinforced the segregation of Oklahoma well into the 20th century and most of the leaders fought to keep the cover-up covered up. When it comes to reparations, and the excuses White leaders and now Black leaders have used to ignore the issue, to just lie, For example, unless there are living witnesses come and tell your story and when they did, more were alive than they expected, they found Whites some who were possibly part of the mob, to testify against. TO only talk about scholarships at the low $300.00 is not only insulting, but disrespect to those who died and fled. They talk about the 2nd amendment as a God-given right, except for the people determined to die.

I lived through the lies, but I was fortunate to have been taught by courageous Black teachers who were determined I would know the truth.  There were other places of rioting in the period called the Red Hot Summer, Coming back from World War I dressed in their uniforms, many Blacks were beaten, the recipients of tragic beatings, hangings and other hideous acts resulting in deaths. This reaffirms how truth crushed to the ground will rise from ashes.  Here is an excellent study of race relations, or better still no relation.  The story even give insight to why racial problems still persists in the 21st century.

Time spent reviewing site: 45 minutes
Used in course