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Lecture 14 - The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

Lecture 14 - The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

This video was recorded at YALE RLST 145 - Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) with Professor Christine Hayes. The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism. Reading assignment: Bible: (1) Introduction to Samuel (JSB pp. 558-61), 1 Sam, 2 Sam (2) Introduction to Kings (JSB pp. 668-71), 1 Kgs 3, 11-12, 16:29-19:21, 21-22; 2 Kgs 8:25-10:36, 17-25 (3) "Historical and Geographical Background to the Bible" (JSB pp. 2052-2055) Sternberg, Meir. The Poetics of Biblical Narrative (Bloomington; Indiana University Press, 1985), pp. 186-222 Optional: Levinson, Deirdre. "The Psychopathology of King Saul." In Out of the Garden: Women Writers on the Bible, eds., Christina Buchmann and Celina Spiegel. New York: Fawcett Columbine, 1994. pp. 123-141 Ozick, Cynthia. "Hannah and Elkanah: Torah as the Matrix for Feminism." In Out of the Garden: Women Writers on the Bible, eds., Christina Buchmann and Celina Spiegel. New York: Fawcett Columbine, 1994. pp. 88-93

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