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Building A New Structure for School Leadership

Building A New Structure for School Leadership

In this essay, Elmore sets forth a novel vision for school leadership that would not reside with individuals, but would instead be distributed among various branches that are fully accountable not only to one another and to teachers, but also to the marketplace – in this case, parents and students. He begins by describing the notion of "loose-coupling," in which the core of education – what and how students are actually learning – resides in isolated individual classrooms. Teachers have a great deal of discretion in what and how they teach, and are intentionally buffered by the system from outside intrusions—leaving administrators, superintendents, and policymakers out of touch, performing tasks designed mainly to increase public confidence in the system: organizing, budgeting, managing,... Show More
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Tina Pitt
Tina Pitt (Faculty)
4 years ago

A deeper insight into strategies leaders could implement would be helpful.

Tina Pitt
Tina Pitt (Faculty)
4 years ago
I completely agree that buffering faculty from outside influences is not an effective teaching and learning model. Faculty need exposure to not only learn new things, but to discover the expectations of the next grade, college or even industry and community. Gehrman's comment regarding a "common culture of expectations" is primary in good leadership. It's the building of a team focused on agreed upon common goals. A good resource to spark discussion. common culture of expectations