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Line and Movement in the Elementary Art Classroom

Line and Movement in the Elementary Art Classroom

This is a lesson plan intended for use in an elementary art classroom with fourth grade students.  The content of the lesson focuses on how artists can use line to create the appearance of action or movement in a work of art. The lesson calls for the use of a Power Point Presentation with slides of various famous, and perhaps not so famous, works of art that are selected for their linear qualities as well as how they show movement.  Suggested artists: Wassilly Kandinsky, Frank Lobdell, Vincent Van Gogh. After viewing the presentation, the students will apply what they've learned by creating a non-objective/abstract water color painting that shows movement.  It is highly recomended that the instructor take digital photographs of any completed student work and include them in the initial... Show More


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Iman Zaatari
Iman Zaatari (Teacher (K-12))
6 years ago

This lesson plan states clearly the objectives and the methods that will help children learn about lines and movement. It states clearly the different lines and its various directions and qualities through a PowerPoint presentation. It also provides multiple means of representation through the art done by famous people in addition to the art done by students from years before. The students will stay engaged throughout the lesson since they will be viewing a series of works of art where they identify the different lines. I would recommend an activity where students actually draw these lines before doing the final project. This could be done as a group activity where each group is assigned different lines and then present them to the class. This way they will get to practice before doing the watercolor painting. Overall, it is a  great lesson plan. Great Job!

Technical Remarks:


Time spent reviewing site: 1hr 15min
Lacey Spieth
Lacey Spieth (Teacher (K-12))
6 years ago

I have done a very similar watercolor lesson showing “movement.” I liked your suggestions of projecting the students’ artwork on a larger scale to produce the wow-factor. The lesson plan was nicely written and easy to follow. I think the PowerPoint used at the start of the lesson with examples of artwork that show movement, and others that do not is a very strong point to the lesson. This allows students to begin analyzing artwork looking for specific principles. This also offers a real world application; students will see how other artists have implemented the principle into their work.

Technical Remarks:

No problems.

Time spent reviewing site: 30