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MERLOT II

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Introduction to Hypothesis Testing -- The Z-Test

        

Introduction to Hypothesis Testing -- The Z-Test

Logo for Introduction to Hypothesis Testing -- The Z-Test
This exercise will help the user understand the logic and procedures of hypothesis testing. To make best use of this exercise, the user should know how to use a z table to find probabilities on a normal distribution, and how to calculate the standard error of a mean. Relevant review materials are available from the links provided. The user will need a copy of the hypothesis testing exercise (link is provided), a table for the standardized normal distribution (z), and a calculator. The user will... More
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Material Type: Tutorial
Date Added to MERLOT: October 14, 2004
Date Modified in MERLOT: November 17, 2015
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Primary Audience: High School, College General Ed
Mobile Compatibility: Not specified at this time
Language: English
Cost Involved: no
Source Code Available: no
Accessibility Information Available: no
Creative Commons: unsure

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Discussion for Introduction to Hypothesis Testing -- The Z-Test

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Avatar for Peggy Hohensee
5 years ago

Peggy Hohensee (Administrator)

I really like how this exercise is designed.  Students can practice, and at each step they are provided with really good feedback concerning their choice.

Technical Remarks:

This presentation has great information, but is lacking in visual appeal.

Time spent reviewing site: 10 minutes

Avatar for Ellen Gundlach
7 years ago

Ellen Gundlach (Faculty)

Nice job of explaining the logical steps and thought processes needed to perform a Z hypothesis test for the population mean. U could see using this activity in a computer lab for a week/chapter when there really isn't any SPSS work. You could also make a homework assignment out of the printable handouts that are provided. I think this could be a much more effective teaching tool if more graphics were used (shading of Normal curve when explaining P-values and conclusions, possibly some pictures to go with the story). Even more spaces between sentences in the explanations would make it easier for the students to read the important material. The author does emphasize the difference between sample and population means, which is important. The null hypothesis question after the applet is very basic. It would have been good to through some inequalities in there to make sure the student knew that the null hypothesis always gets the equal sign.

Technical Remarks:

When I clicked on the link to the applet in Firefox, I was sent to a search page, not to the applet. The applet was the first link listed on the search page. For the second example, the applet link came right up.
Time spent reviewing site: 20 minutes