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Explorations in Learning and Instruction: The Theory Into Practice Debate

Explorations in Learning and Instruction: The Theory Into Practice Debate

Database of summaries of 50 major theories of learning and instruction ranging from John Anderson's ACT* Theory to Robert Sternberg's Triarchic Theory. Includes applications of theories to learning domains (aviation to sales) and concepts (arousal to transfer). Additional information available on theories by following links. Also includes Quicktime movies of some of the theorists.

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John Whitman
John Whitman (Faculty)
15 years ago
I have used this site for various tutor training courses I've developed as a
means of introduction to learning theory. The comprehensive list is more than
students need for an introduction, so I would direct the class to specific
theories (usually adult learning, constructivism, and operant conditioning, and
have them read the descriptions, and then discuss with one another either in
class or on a web board the relevance of the theory to the activity of tutoring.
I introduce the discussions from a metacognitive perspective and encourage the
peer tutors to begin to be aware of their own thinking processes and consider
the implications that this self-awareness has on themselves and the students
they assist. I encourage the tutors to actively engage their students with this
idea also, and help begin to develop a self-awareness of learning that
transcends any direct discipline content. I have not used the Domain or Concepts
sections of the site. Content is well-presented and thorough; includes good
summaries and appropriated references. Overall, a good introduction to a
complex discipline, and one that would probably require some didrection on the
part of the instructor, at least when used as a preliminary introduction.

Technical Remarks:

Direct and well presented; easy to navigate. Direction through the lists would
probably be helpful to introductory level students.